AT&T DNS Provisioning Tool


DNS Provisioning Tool: Online Help

DPT Glossary

Address (A)  |  ARIN  |  BIND  |  CIDR  |  CNAME  |  DNS  |  Domain Name  |  FQDN  |  HINFO  |  ICANN  |  IP Address  |  ISC  |  InterNIC  |  MX  |  NS  |  NS - Primary Zone  |  NS - Secondary Zone  |  PTR  |  Reverse Order Lookup  |  Secondary NS  |  Secondary Zones  |  SOA  |  TLD  |  TTL  |  TXT  |  WKS  |  Zone  |  SRV 

(Address) A Record Maps a domain name to an IP (Internet Protocol) address.
(Address) AAAA Record Maps a domain name to an IPv6 (Internet Protocol) address.
ARIN (American Registry Internet Number) The organization in the U.S. that manages Internet address numbers for the U.S. and assigned territories. Because Internet addresses must be unique and because address space on the Internet is limited, there is a need for some organization to control and allocate address number blocks.;
BIND (Berkely Internet Name Domain) A generic software that implements the DNS function.
CNAME (Canonical Name) Record Allows you to assign an alias, or a nickname, to an existing domain name. CNAME records can assign multiple domain names to one host.
CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) A way to allocate and specify the Internet addresses used in inter-domain routing more flexibly than with the original system of Internet Protocol (IP) address classes. As a result, the number of available Internet addresses has been greatly increased. CIDR is now the routing system used by virtually all gateway hosts on the Internet's backbone network. The Internet's regulating authorities now expect every Internet service provider (ISP) to use it for routing.
DNS (Domain Name System) A distributed database used to store information about hosts on the Internet. DNS is an Internet directory. It translates between domain names and IP addresses, and controls e-mail delivery.
Domain Name A user friendly name assigned to IP addresses. It allows users to type in names like www.att.com, instead of an Internet Protocol (IP) address like 100.00.000.00 (IPv4) or 1000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000 (IPv6).
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FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) Record The exact location of a host as it relates to the root (dot "."). This is the name of every element leading to the host's domain name, starting with the most specific element (the host name) and ending with the most general (the root).
HINFO (Host Information) Record Lists the hardware platform and operating system for a host.
ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) The private (non-government) non-profit corporation with responsibility for Internet address space allocation, protocol parameter assignment, domain name system management, and root server system management functions, the service previously performed by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).
IP Address A code that identifies an interface with a computer using numbers in an IPv4 dotted octet representation (100.00.000.00) or an IPv6 colon-hexadecimal reprepresentation (1000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000).
ISC (Internet Software Consortium) Develops and distributes generic BIND software.
InterNIC Until recently, InterNIC (Internet Network Information Center), a cooperative activity between the U.S. government and Network Solutions, Inc., was the organization responsible for registering and maintaining the com, net, and org top-level domain names on the World Wide Web. The actual registration was performed by Network Solutions, Inc. As a result of a new U. S. Government Statement of Policy (known as "the white paper") in October, 1998, competition will be introduced in domain name registration for these top-level domains and a new, non-profit global organization, the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), has been designated to conduct the registrar accreditation process. ICANN has initially designated five new registrar companies - in addition to Network Solutions - for a two-month test period. After that period, additional registrars are expected to be accredited.
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MX (Mail Exchange) Record Identifies the mail host to which e-mail for a zone will be sent. MX records direct the e-mail coming into a domain to the preferred mail servers.
NS (Name Server) Record A NS (Name Server) record identifies a particular DNS server that provides service for a zone. Zones have multiple NS records, one for the zone's Primary DNS Server and one for each of the zone's secondary servers. The DPT application handles NS records differently depending on whether AT&T is providing Primary DNS service or Secondary DNS service for a zone.
NS Record - PRIMARY ZONE When AT&T provides primary DNS service for a zone, a primary and secondary AT&T DNS server, each located at a different geographic site, are automatically assigned to the zone.

You cannot add, delete, or update the NS records for these AT&T Name Servers using the DPT application.
For a primary zone, the NS records for non-AT&T Name Servers are the only records you can add, delete, and update using the DPT application.

Customers who wish to run their own secondary DNS servers for a zone should use the DPT application to add a non-AT&T NS record for each of these secondary servers. All changes to NS records must also be reflected in the DNS registry so the DNS root servers will be updated appropriately.
NS Record - Secondary Zone For a secondary zone, the NS records for non-AT&T Name Servers are the only records you can add, delete, and update using the DPT application.

When a secondary zone is created, a non-AT&T NS record is generated to identify the host that is the zone's Primary DNS Server.
This server is registered with the appropriate DNS registrar as authoritative for the zone.

Before you change the name or IP address of this server, be sure that the zone has been loaded onto the new server and that the appropriate DNS registrar change has been submitted.

The AT&T DNS servers identified in the AT&T NS records must be able to reach the non-AT&T Name Server and perform a zone transfer from that server.
In addition to the AT&T secondary Name Servers, customers may desire to set up their own secondary Name Servers, but doing so does not require any changes to be made via the DPT.
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PTR (Pointer) Record - IPv4 Maps an IP address to a host by reversing the first three numbers of the IP, and adding in-addr.arpa to the end, i.e.: 000.00.100.in-addr.arpa.
PTR (Pointer) Record - IPv6 Reverse DNS lookups for IPv6 addresses use the special domain ip6.arpa. An IPv6 address appears as a name in this domain as a sequence of nibbles in reverse order, represented as hexadecimal digits as subdomains. The pointer domain name corresponding to the IPv6 address 2001:db8::567:89ab is b.a.9.8.7.6.5.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.8.b.d.0.1.0.0.2.ip6.arpa.
Reverse Order Lookup Allows you to map an IP to a domain using PTR records.
RFC (Request For Comment) The following RFCs apply to DNS services:

RFC 1034 Domain Names - Concepts and Facilities

RFC 1035 Domain Names - Implementation and Specification

RFC 2181 Clarifications to the DNS Specification

RFC 2317 Classless IN-ADDR.ARPA Delegation

RFC 4291 IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture
Secondary NS (Name Server) A secondary name server uses a process called a zone transfer to load data over the network from another authoritative (primary) name server. Designating one or more secondary name servers helps to make the DNS more robust, but you do not need to be a secondary server for anyone else.
Secondary Zones When a secondary zone is created, a non-AT&T NS record is generated to identify the host that is the zone's Primary DNS Server. This server is registered with the appropriate DNS registrar as authoritative for the zone.

Before you change the name or IP address of this server, be sure that the zone has been loaded onto the new server and that the appropriate DNS registrar change has been submitted.

The AT&T DNS servers identified in the AT&T NS records must be able to reach the non-AT&T Name Server and perform a zone transfer from that server.
SOA (Start of Authority) Record An SOA (Start of Authority) record validates the name server hosting the zone as the best source of information for data. The SOA also provides technical contact data such as the e-mail address of the zone administrators, and secondary name server control parameters.

The creation of an SOA is coupled with the creation of a DNS zone. Because the SOA record contains information critical to the existence of a DNS zone, it can not be added or deleted within the DPT application.

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TLD (Top-Level Domain) A top-level domain (TLD) is the portion of a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) or Internet address that identifies the general type of Internet domain, such as "com" for "commercial," "edu" for "educational," and so forth.
TTL (Time To Live) The amount of time, in seconds, for which each local name server retains a cached copy of the DNS resource record.
TXT (Text) Record Used for free-form comments about a domain.
WKS (Well-known Service) Record Describes services provided by a particular protocol on an interface. DPT doesn't provide WKS records. They must be requested through AT&T Customer Care.
Zone A limited part of a domain that is delegated to a company. The physical database definition that will include one domain and some, all or none of its subdomains.
SRV (Service type of the server) SRV record is to locate services. It also allows administrator to distribute load and provide backup services.
For specific information, select an appropriate link below:
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